Haus der Kunst Munich, Phyllida Barlow. Is waste art?

On May 26th this year, it was finally allowed to visit a museum again after the long lockdown. After a short inquiry it was clear to me that I absolutely had to see the exhibition of Phyllida Barlow at the Haus der Kunst. The brief description promised an exciting experience in art:

Phyllida Barlow‘s sculptural structures are unwieldy and difficult to take in: timber, cardboard, cement, clay, plastic pipes, and colorful textiles pile up, spread out, or block the visitors’ way. The view ranges over these landscapes made of everyday materials, unsure what to hold on to, and drifts up to grasp their enormous dimensions. Barlow‘s works pose a constant challenge; they conquer the space as if they led a life of their own. They invite viewers to reconsidering spaces, perceive volume, and hear the language of architecture.

Source: https://hausderkunst.de/ausstellungen/phyllida-barlow?locale=en, Access August 6, 2021.

The museum’s website has a lot more really fascinating information, videos, pictures, etc. about the exhibition. Worth seeing!

My expectations were accordingly high and in no way disappointed. I was totally thrilled by the dimensions of the artworks and especially by the wacky ideas of the artist. I’ll just let the photos (see gallery) speak for themselves and refrain from commenting. However, one experience left a lasting impression on me. As I strolled around one of the artworks, a museum employee approached me and told me that it was allowed to go inside the artwork. What a fascinating experience. I made a video about it, it can be found on YouTube and in the Instagram story accompanying the post. Enjoy locking at the photos.

Stay tuned.

More about art…